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Uncompromised | Race & Racism

What can Christians do to tackle the topic of racism? In the fifth week of Uncompromised: Holding to Christian Convictions in a Cancel Culture, John Elmore, Marvin Walker, Sierra Sanchez, and Oscar Castillo share how (and why) we can pursue God’s ideals of diversity, unity, peace, and reconciliation.

Oscar Castillo, John Elmore, Sierra Sanchez, Marvin WalkerNov 14, 2021

In This Series (6)
Uncompromised | Immigration & Persecution of Church Internationally
Oscar CastilloNov 21, 2021
Uncompromised | Race & Racism
Oscar Castillo, John Elmore, Sierra Sanchez, Marvin WalkerNov 14, 2021
Uncompromised | Sexuality: Gender, Sex, and Porn
John ElmoreNov 7, 2021
Uncompromised | Sanctity of Life
John Elmore, Bruce KendrickOct 31, 2021
Uncompromised | Law & Religious Liberties
John ElmoreOct 24, 2021
Uncompromised | Truth & Culture
John ElmoreOct 17, 2021

Summary

What can Christians do to tackle the topic of racism? In the fifth week of Uncompromised: Holding to Christian Convictions in a Cancel Culture, John Elmore, Marvin Walker, Sierra Sanchez, and Oscar Castillo share how (and why) we can pursue God’s ideals of diversity, unity, peace, and reconciliation.

Key Takeaways

  • While we can’t change the past, we are living right now. And we have influence as salt and light to live uncompromised and to bring forth a beautiful reality to the world.
  • With man, differences divide us. With God, differences glorify Him. It shows His creativity, His design, and His intent. Diversity is a reflection of God and His glory.
  • To have unity in diversity, we need to have a humble posture. We need to have a desire to learn and to listen.
  • The sin of partiality is to treat others differently and make judgments before we get to know them. Racism is an outworking of the sin of partiality.
  • You may not be racist, but you may be partial and thereby commit the sin of partiality.
  • Why should we strive for diversity? In Matthew 6:10, in the Lord’s prayer, we pray “Your kingdom come, your will be done, on earth as it is in heaven.” So, what does heaven look like? Revelation 7:9-10 describes heaven as having “a great multitude” “from every nation, from all tribes and peoples and languages” praising God together. That would be heaven on earth.
  • There is beauty in diversity. The church should be like a mosaic: a bunch of broken pieces of different colors and shapes that come together to make a beautiful picture.
  • The church is called to unity, not uniformity.
  • Saying that you are “colorblind” and ignoring differences between people is not always helpful. Instead, we should celebrate the unique qualities in different races.
  • If you have been hurt by racism, acknowledge the hurt. Don’t isolate and remove yourself; instead, move towards the person who has hurt you and seek reconciliation.
  • We have all been given a ministry of reconciliation (2 Corinthians 5:18). All of us. Christ has called us to harmony. We are to maintain that unity and our uniqueness.
  • Partiality means having an unjust or unreasonable preference. To show partiality is to mock the Creator by mocking the created.
  • If everybody in your life looks the same, that might be an indicator of partiality, perhaps even on a subconscious level.
  • Most of the time, when thinking about partiality, we think about who we exclude. But it’s also about who we bring in. It’s not just what you don’t do, but what you do.
  • In the church, you can have awkward conversations. It’s OK.
  • The people who developed critical race theory, or CRT, saw that there was a problem in the world. We agree that there is a problem; we just have a different solution. The healing and restoration we are looking for will only come through Jesus our Lord.
  • Instead of CRT, we need KRT: Kingdom Race Truth. We have to submit to God and His Word above all else.
  • Like Josiah in 2 Kings 22, we see the sin, we mourn the sin, and then we follow what’s written. Loving our Lord and loving our neighbors is a beautiful solution.
  • Empathy creates pathways to connection.
  • We are called to make peace. We can’t make peace if we don’t move towards it. We need to move from being spectators to Shalom chasers.

Discussing and Applying the Sermon

  • What would it look like to pursue people outside of your friend group? How can you go out and initiate conversations with people who look differently or think differently than you?
  • Who should you invite to lunch, coffee, or Thanksgiving dinner in an effort to get to know and understand each other better?
  • Is there anyone you need to reconcile with—someone who has hurt you, or who you have hurt? Start that conversation today.

Other Mentioned or Recommended Resources

  • Suggested Scripture study: Acts 6:1; Genesis 1:27; Matthew 6:10; Revelation 7:9-10; Galatians 3:28; 2 Corinthians 5:18; Romans 2:11; Acts 10:34-36; Galatians 2:11-14; John 17:11; 2 Kings 22:11-13; James 1:25; 1 Corinthians 12:25-26; Galatians 6:2; John 4:4; Romans 12:18; Hebrews 12:14; James 3:18
  • Article: What Does the Bible Say About Racial Injustice?; Uncompromised Resources