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Love Your Neighbor

What does it look like to build relationships with those who live in your neighborhood? Going into the summer, Jeff Ward breaks down three helpful descriptions of good neighbors and three obstacles that can keep us from becoming good neighbors.

Jeff WardMay 23, 2021

In This Series (6)
Love Your Neighbor
Jeff WardMay 23, 2021
Three Things That Never Change
Blake HolmesMay 2, 2021
Making Room for Kids | Luke 18:15-17
David Penuel, Sean Hill, KyLea IngramApr 18, 2021
Oh, But God
Todd WagnerApr 4, 2021
Oh, But God
Connor BaxterApr 4, 2021Frisco
Evening with the Elders
Todd Wagner, Beau Fournet, Kyle Thompson, David Leventhal, Mickey FriedrichFeb 20, 2021

Summary

What does it look like to build relationships with those who live in your neighborhood? Going into the summer, Jeff Ward breaks down three helpful descriptions of good neighbors and three obstacles that can keep us from becoming good neighbors.

Key Takeaways

  • The indicative often precedes the imperative. Before Scripture tells us how to act, it tells us who we are (2 Corinthians 5:17-21).
  • The more we understand who we are in Christ (His ambassadors) the better neighbors we become.
  • Three visuals of good neighbors: First Responders, The Unlikely Friend, and Host
  • Three “fences” that keep us from being good neighbors: Time, Fear of the Unknown, and Overthinking
  • In Greek, “time” can be translated either “chronos” or “kairos”. Chronos is quantitative and kairos is more qualitative. Kairos is the servant of holy purpose.
  • Time is not something to be managed but to be invested in others.
  • As believers in Christ, all of life is a divine interruption.
  • We have something in common with everyone, it just takes time to find it.
  • Our goal as neighbors is to simply have a conversation that opens the door for future conversations.
  • Our job is not to convert people, but to be faithful to demonstrate the gospel to our neighbors.
  • Everyone has a story, so just share yours.
  • Missional living starts in your neighborhood, but it doesn’t end there.

Discussing and Applying the Sermon

  • What tends to hold you back from developing relationships with your neighbors?
  • What is your typical response to interruptions? Do you view them as opportunities or obstacles?
  • What are some best practices for finding common ground with others and having a host mentality? Brainstorm some ideas and conversation starters with those in your community group.

Other Mentioned or Recommended Resources