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Oh, But God

In this Easter weekend message, Todd Wagner shows us how God’s promise to perfectly bless mankind by blessing imperfect Abraham culminated in the provision of the perfect Lamb of God who laid down His life as a perfect sacrifice for our sins.

Todd WagnerApr 4, 2021

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Jeff WardMay 23, 2021
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David Penuel, Sean Hill, KyLea IngramApr 18, 2021
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Oh, But God
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Todd Wagner, Beau Fournet, Kyle Thompson, David Leventhal, Mickey FriedrichFeb 20, 2021

Summary

What are two of the best words in the Bible? But God. Through the stories of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, we see a God of nonstop grace and faithfulness pursue unfaithful people in a world of nonstop trouble. In this Easter weekend message, Todd Wagner shows us how God’s promise to perfectly bless mankind by blessing imperfect Abraham culminated in the provision of the perfect Lamb of God who laid down His life as a perfect sacrifice for our sins.

Key Takeaways

  • Why does God refer to Himself in the Old Testament as “The God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob?” (Exodus 3:6; Matthew 22:32) It’s an invitation to examine their lives and see that God is faithful to do what He says He will do regardless of whether the people He pursues are consistently faithful.
  • Why is this world marred by sin and death? Because men chose to lean on their own understanding (Proverbs 3:5-6) rather than on God. What once was Edenic (Genesis 2) is now a mess (Genesis 3) – a place filled with hopelessness and despair. But God continues to pursue and rescue His people.
  • God knew that the offspring of Adam and Eve needed His mercy, so generations later, He pursued Abram (Abraham). God promised Abraham that He would: 1) make his name great; 2) make Abraham a blessing so he could be a blessing to many others; 3) Make a great nation through Abraham. (Genesis 12:1-3). Abram did nothing to deserve this. God chose Abraham not because Abraham was good, but because God is good.
  • Isaac was the son of Abraham and Sarah (Genesis 17:17; 18:12), and he repeated the sins his father committed. But God continue to rescue His people through the story of Isaac (Genesis 22:1-14).
  • Jacob was a deceiver (Genesis 25-26) who made his way through life by his own will. When God came to Jacob in the desert, he was sleeping with his head on a rock – a picture of a life apart from God (Genesis 28:10-17). But God, being rich in mercy, pursued him. And through Jacob’s 12 sons by four different women, God’s promise to Abraham continued to be fulfilled – not because Jacob was faithful, but because God is.
  • People living under the sacrificial system of the Old Testament were living in a world of non-stop trouble. But God, with his non-stop grace, gave us His Son – the perfect Lamb of God (John 1:29) who laid down His life as a perfect sacrifice for our sins.
  • Because “the Word became flesh, and dwelt among us” (John 1:14), unclean people were healed (Matthew 9:20-22; Mark 5:25-34; Luke 8:43-48), the blind could see (Matthew 9:27-30; Mark 8:22-25; John 9:1-7), and the deranged became of sound mind (Mark 5:1-17; Luke 8:26-37).
  • We’re not saved through behavior change (Romans 3:21-26; Romans 5:6-11). We’re saved by acknowledging our hopelessness and, in our need, turning to Jesus and receiving His mercy and grace.
  • The Bible is not a rule book, it’s a rescue story. It’s not laws you must follow, it’s a legacy of God’s faithfulness – a record of His reckless pursuit of mankind.

  • Our risen King (Luke 24; John 11:25; Mark 16:5-6) is not finished transforming lives and writing stories (2 Corinthians 5:17; Romans 12:2; Philippians 1:6). He still redeems the broken, heals our pain, and gives us strength in our weakness.

  • Jesus blesses us with His free gift of mercy (Ephesians 2:8-9) so that we can be a blessing to others (John 14:12).

Discussing and Applying the Sermon:

  • Have you read the stories of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob? Read and discuss how you see God’s faithfulness at work despite man’s unfaithfulness.
  • Are you tempted to believe that God’s Word is a rulebook, rather than a rescue story? What sins and unfaithfulness to God do you need to confess?
  • What story is God writing in your life? Where do you see Him at work in the lives of those around you? Write down those reflections and share them with other believers in your life. Thank God that His story is still being written through lives transformed by the power of Jesus Christ.
  • If you’ve been blessed by Christ’s free gift of grace, how are you serving as a blessing to others? Who do you need to share the gospel with this week?

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